Bonsai for Men, is a not entirely serious bonsai guide for men

Of course, women are also welcome to read this book. Finding inner peace has become almost impossible and a luxury in this day and age. This book aims to show what bonsai can do to us. Since men always know the way, only to go around the block the wrong way three times, this book was written. The non-fiction book for beginners to Japanese gardening, it succinctly describes all the topics man of the world needs to know about bonsai. From a brief introduction to bonsai history to repotting and watering, the most common topics are covered. But it also shows what is behind the term "Suiseki" and "Penjing". This bonsai book for men, however, is intended to be more than the usual guidebook on these special potted plants. It is also meant to make you think about the great meaning of bonsai. It is not just about chipping away at trees, but about finding inner peace with oneself. Bonsai can offer all this if you understand what is important. You enter into a partnership with the little trees, committing yourself to looking after them, protecting them and caring for them. If we don't, the tree dies. If we do it right, our care is for a certain period of time and then the next generation takes care of the bonsai once we die. So we are only guests, so to speak, and are allowed to accompany the tree for a while and shape it. Bonsai for Men also points out that we should occupy ourselves with being receptive again in order to observe. This also has something to do with bonsai and is often underestimated. As meditative as a walk in the forest can be, it is also important to observe the bonsai. In today's fast-paced society, technology generally plays a higher role than nature. With Bonsai for Men, you get an insight into a new world of small trees. So if you are looking for a bonsai book for men, if you are interested in a non-fiction book and guidebook that will take you into the world of small trees and make you laugh and smile a little, then you definitely need this book.

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